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IAUC 1991: 1967a; Poss. NEW Sat OF SATURN

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                                                  Circular No. 1991
Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams
INTERNATIONAL ASTRONOMICAL UNION
Postal Address: Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
Cable Address: SATELLITES, NEWYORK
Western Union: RAPID SATELLITE CAMBMASS


PERIODIC COMET TUTTLE (1967a)
     Dr. H. Hirose, Tokyo Astronomical Observatory, cables that
K. Tomita has recovered this comet as follows:

     1967 UT          R.A. (1950) Decl.    Mag.
     Jan.  3.48403   22 30.0    +42 57     15
           4.48467   22 33.6    +42 39     15

Object diffuse, without central condensation or nuclues, nothing
reported about a tail.  The positions are very close to the prediction
by B. G. Marsden on IAUC 1988, for which the elements are
as follows:

     T = 1967 Mar. 31.2098 ET         Epoch = 1967 Mar. 11.0 ET
 Peri. = 206.9156                         e =   0.821910
 Node  = 269.7892     1950.0              a =   5.743895 AU
 Incl. =  54.3750                         n =   0.0715969
     q =   1.022932 AU                    P =  13.77 years


POSSIBLE NEW SATELLITE OF SATURN
     Mr. R. L. Walker, U.S. Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station,
reports that a bright spot, presumably the new satellite of Saturn,
appears near the eastern edge of the ring on four plates taken with
the 61-inch telescope on 1966 December 18.16.  The spot moved
between exposures and was of magnitude 13.5.
     Dr. G. P. Kuiper, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University
of Arizona, informs us that several hundred photographs of Saturn
were taken with the 61-inch Cataline reflector during October,
November and December.  The ring could be photographed at all times,
even when edge on.  Between the nodal passages, when the dark side
was facing the earth, the ring presented a stationary notched
appearance.  Satellites were recorded only to magnitude 13, and all
those observed are accounted for.  Dr. Kuiper will obtain additional
exposures to confirm whether a new satellite exists.


1967 January 6                 (1991)              Owen Gingerich

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