IAU Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams

Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams -- Image credits

IAUC 3456: SNe; 1979l; 1980 S 2

The following International Astronomical Union Circular may be linked-to from your own Web pages, but must not otherwise be redistributed (see these notes on the conditions under which circulars are made available on our WWW site).


Read IAUC 3455  SEARCH Read IAUC 3457
IAUC number


                                                  Circular No. 3456
Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams
INTERNATIONAL ASTRONOMICAL UNION
Postal Address: Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
TWX 710-320-6842 ASTROGRAM CAM     Telephone 617-864-5758


SUPERNOVAE
     B. Szeidl, Konkoly Observatory, reports that M. Lovas has
discovered three supernovae in anonymous galaxies as follows:

     No.  1980 UT   R.A. (1950) Decl.    mpg  dR.A. cos Decl. dDecl.
      1   Feb. 21   12 17.9   +31 27    15.5     + 9"         - 9"
      2   Feb. 22   11 17.0   +54 44    16.0     +16            0
      3   Feb. 22   13 43.4   +48 00    17.5     - 7            0

dR.A. cos Decl. and dDecl. represent the differences supernovae minus nuclei.


COMET BRADFIELD (1979l)
     C. B. Cosmovici, Max-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrische
Physik; and S. Ortolani, Asiago Astrophysical Observatory, report:
"A 10-min exposure (Kodak 103a-O emulsion) with the 0.90-m Schmidt
telescope on Feb. 4.78 UT shows a narrow plasma tail, 1o.73 long,
containing several filaments.  The dust tail is 16' long, and the
visible coma has a diameter of 5'.  Spectrograms obtained between
Feb. 4 and 12 with the 1.20-m and 1.82-m telescopes (dispersion 12
x 10**-6; ITT tube; 120-min exposure) show strong C2, CN and the C3
band in the visible region (388.0-563.5 nm); H2O+ is also present
at 614.8 nm and O I at 633.0 nm.  The near infrared is dominated by
cometary bands at 771.0 and 773.6 nm; they could be identified with
the Phillips (3-0) band of C2."


1980 S 2
     B. A. Smith, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, reports that H. J.
Reitsema, S. M. Larson and himself have made CCD observations of a
Saturnian satellite, clearly separated from the edge-on rings.  The
object, of magnitude ~ 14.5 (at wavelength 0.9 um), was evidently
very close to greatest elongation, ~ 25" west of the center of
Saturn, on Feb. 23.406 UT; some deceleration was evident during the
observations, extending over ~ 1 hr with the 1.5-m reflector.

     It is plausible that 1980 S 2 = 1980 S 1 (IAUC 3454), and six
intervening revolutions yield P ~ 16h40m, in close agreement with
1966 S 2 (Fountain and Larson 1978, Icarus 36, 92; Aksnes and
Franklin 1978, ibid. 36, 107, orbits 15 or 16).  Identity 1980 S 2
= 1979 S 7 would imply P = 16h38m (109.5 intervening revolutions) or
16h47m (108.5 revolutions); 1979 S 2 (IAUC 3417) has P ~ 16h46m.


1980 February 29               (3456)              Brian G. Marsden

Read IAUC 3455  SEARCH Read IAUC 3457


Our Web policy. Index to the CBAT/MPC/ICQ pages.


Valid HTML 4.01!