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IAUC 3470: Sats OF JUPITER; Sats OF SATURN

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                                                  Circular No. 3470
Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams
INTERNATIONAL ASTRONOMICAL UNION
Postal Address: Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
TWX 710-320-6842 ASTROGRAM CAM     Telephone 617-864-5758


SATELLITES OF JUPITER
     E. C. Stone, Voyager Project, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, reports
that a new satellite, designated 1979 J 2, has been discovered
on images obtained during the encounter of Voyager 1 with Jupiter.
S. P. Synnott, of the Voyager Navigation Team, first found
the new satellite's shadow on Jupiter in two frames taken on 1979
Mar. 5.  Subsequently, the object and its shadow were located in
transit across Jupiter in one frame taken during the previous orbit,
and the satellite was also identified in six frames taken the orbit
before that.  1979 J 2, of diameter ~ 70-80 km, has an orbital
revolution period of 16h15m and a mean distance of 3.12 Rj from
Jupiter.  The Voyager 2 discovery of 1979 J 1 (Jewitt et al. 1979,
Science 206, 951) has also been confirmed in five Voyager 1 frames
showing this satellite in transit across Jupiter on two consecutive
orbits on 1979 Mar. 4; the revolution period of 1979 J 1 has
been revised to 7h04m and the mean distance to 1.79 Rj.


SATELLITES OF SATURN
     C. Veillet, Lycee Technique de St. Die, communicates the
following separations (uncertainty +/- 0".2), observed using an
astrometric camera and IIa-D plates on the 1.05-m Pic du Midi reflector,
of 1966 S 2 east (+) and west (-) of the center of Saturn: Apr.
9.9243 UT, -23".31; 9.9333, -23".79; 9.9520, -23".50; 10.9722, +23".63;
10.9792, +23".70; 10.9861, +23".67; 10.9930, +23".55; 11.0076, +22".98;
11.0146, +22".44; 11.9590, -20".15; 11.9681, -20".81; 11.9729, -21".39;
11.9785, -22".16; 11.9896, -22".50; 11.9944, -22".77; 11.9986, -22".91,
12.0028, -23".10; 12.0069, -23".27; 12.0111, -23".55; 12.0153, -23".62;
12.0187, -23".71; 12.0222, -23".77; 12.0271, -23".62.  The inferred
times of greatest elongation are Apr. 10.9803 (east) and 12.0204
(west).  Four other unidentified satellites were observed as follows:
1980 S 15, Apr. 9.9132, +23".10; 1980 S 16, Apr. 10.9792,
-22".10; 10.9861, -21".85; 10.9930, -21".30; 11.0146, -20".94; 1980 S
17, Apr. 11.9729, +24".09; 11.9785, +24".26; 11.9896, +24".50; 11.9944
+24".54; 11.9986, +24".60; 12.0028, +24".48; 12.0069, +24".26; 1980 S
18, Apr. 12.0153, -24".80; 12.0271, -25".60; 12.0299, -26".12; 12.0333,
-26".35; 12.0389, -26".12.  1980 S 15, 1980 S 16 and 1980 S 17 are as
bright as 1966 S 2; 1980 S 18 is fainter than Saturn VII (Hyperion).


1980 April 28                  (3470)              Brian G. Marsden

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