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IAUC 3483: Sats OF SATURN

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                                                  Circular No. 3483
Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams
INTERNATIONAL ASTRONOMICAL UNION
Postal Address: Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
TWX 710-320-6842 ASTROGRAM CAM     Telephone 617-864-5758


SATELLITES OF SATURN
     J. Lecacheux, Observatoire de Meudon, reports the following
analyses and further electronographic observations by P. Laques at
Pic du Midi and by G. Wierick and G. Lelievre at Haute Provence of
separations of satellites (+ = east, - = west) from Saturn's
center:

     1966 S 2 = 1980 S 1 = 1980 S 2: Mar. 1.0488 UT, +22".16; 17.031,
+21".83.  Revised elements from the data on IAUC 3470-3474: greatest
eastern elongation = 1980 Mar. 18.317 UT + light time + 0.0019
(U - 45o.6) + 0.69465 E.  The identities with 1979 S 7 and 1979 S 1
are invalid, the orbital longitude of 1966 S 2 at the time of the
closest approach of Pioneer 11 having been L = 121o +/- 3o. [Editorial
Note.  It now seems probable that the correct definition of 1966
S 2 is orbit 16 in the paper by Aksnes and Franklin (1978, Icarus
36, 107); see also Fountain and Larson (1978, ibid. 36, 92).  The
designation 1966 S 1 refers to an orbit with period 0.75 day, and no
object with this period is now believed to exist.]

     1980 S 3 = 1980 S 4 = 1980 S 5 = 1980 S 8 (observation on IAUC
3463 only) = 1980 S 11 = 1980 S 15 = 1980 S 16 = 1980 S 17 = 1980
S 19: Mar. 17.009 UT, -21".6; 18.040, +22".3.  Elements (fitting the
indicated observations with a standard deviation of 0".5): greatest
eastern elongation = 1980 Mar. 18.645 UT + light time + 0.0019
(U - 45o.6) + 0.6939 E.  Other published observations (i.e., 1979 S 7,
1980 S 7, 1980 S 9, 1980 S 18, 1980 S 20, 1980 S 21 and the IAUC
3466 observation attributed to 1980 S 8 [here redesignated 1980 S 23:
Ed.] do not fit any single circular solution.  [Editorial Note. The
suggestion that there exists a second satellite essentialy in the
orbit of 1966 S 2 and about 180o from it was privately made to the
Central Bureau by B. A. Smith, University of Arizona, early in
March.  It is quite possible that 1980 S 3 = 1979 S 1, for which
W. H. Blume has given the time of greatest western elongation (at
Saturn) as 1979 Aug. 31.997 +/- 0.004 UT.  1979 S 2 and 1979 S 4 can
together presumably be related to 1966 S 2 and 1980 S 3.]

     1980 S 6 = 1980 S 10 = 1980 S 12 = 1980 S 14: Mar. 1.030 UT,
+62".4; 1.049, +62".2; 1.099, +61".4; 1.131, +59".9 (refinement to IAUC
3457).  [Editorial Note.  The suggestion that 1980 S 6 = 1980 S 10
with period 2.75 days was included with the information provided by
P. Lamy and N. Mauron for publication on IAUC 3463.  Both Smith and
Lecacheux have suggested that 1980 S 6 is associated with the triangular
libration point leading Saturn IV (Dione).  It is possible
that 1980 S 13 is associated with the corresponding trailing point.]


1980 June 6                    (3483)              Brian G. Marsden

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