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IAUC 7420: (719)

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                                                  Circular No. 7420
Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams
INTERNATIONAL ASTRONOMICAL UNION
Mailstop 18, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
IAUSUBS@CFA.HARVARD.EDU or FAX 617-495-7231 (subscriptions)
BMARSDEN@CFA.HARVARD.EDU or DGREEN@CFA.HARVARD.EDU (science)
URL http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/iau/cbat.html  ISSN 0081-0304
Phone 617-495-7244/7440/7444 (for emergency use only)


(719) ALBERT = 2000 JW8
     An asteroidal object with unusual motion, first detected on May 1 by
J. A. Larsen and reobserved on May 3 and 6 by R. S. McMillan and J. V. Scotti
in the course of the Spacewatch program at Kitt Peak and placed on the NEO
Confirmation Page, was also observed on May 9 by M. Hicks and R. Fevig with
the 2.1-m Kitt Peak reflector.  G. V. Williams, Minor Planet Center, has
identified this object, designated 2000 JW8, with (719) Albert, the last
'lost' numbered minor planet.  Selected observations follow:

     2000 UT             R.A. (2000) Decl.         V    Observer
     May   1.19935   11 38 04.81   + 2 35 21.7   21.6   Larsen
           2.17479   11 37 40.78   + 2 39 31.5   21.1   McMillan
           6.20445   11 36 12.18   + 2 55 25.2   22.3   Scotti
           9.16403   11 35 18.54   + 3 05 46.0          Hicks

     Further details, including residuals for the 1911 and 2000 observations,
are given on MPEC 2000-J37, and Williams' orbital elements there, reproduced
below, show that the analysis by Kristensen and West (1989, A.Ap. 218, 317;
a = 2.645 AU, e = 0.550, i = 11.0 deg) was a significant improvement over
earlier estimates.  The 1913 Crossley search (Curtis 1913, Lick Obs. Bull.
8, 47) was centered some 2 deg from the object's actual position, and the
1915 prediction (Seagrave 1915, A.J. 28, 202) requires correction by Delta T
= +47 days.  Close (September) approaches to the earth occur in 1911, 1941,
1971 and 2001 (minimum 0.205, 0.206, 0.316 and 0.286 AU, and, with H = 15.8,
brightest V = 13.7, 13.7, 15.5 and 15.2, respectively).

                    Epoch = 1911 Dec. 30.0 TT
     T = 1911 Aug. 29.5289 TT         Peri. = 151.9113
     e = 0.548973                     Node  = 186.8071  2000.0
     q = 1.189954 AU                  Incl. =  10.9429
       a =  2.638322 AU    n = 0.2299917    P =   4.285 years

                    Epoch = 2000 Feb. 26.0 TT
     T = 2001 Aug. 21.2582 TT         Peri. = 154.2885
     e = 0.548273                     Node  = 184.9305  2000.0
     q = 1.191053 AU                  Incl. =  11.3095
       a =  2.636667 AU    n = 0.2302084    P =   4.281 years

There were also perihelia T = 1941 Aug. 31.0 and 1971 Aug. 20.0.

                      (C) Copyright 2000 CBAT
2000 May 9                     (7420)              Brian G. Marsden

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